Issue 1 Foreword

Updated: Mar 29


This Foreword is written by Kroeger Policy Review's Editor-in-Chief, Brian Huynh.

I’m very proud to introduce Kroeger Policy Review’s first issue on race, religion and culture!


The issue touches on themes of race, religion, and culture not just because they are critical in the present, but because they are the foundation of society, the elements that bind us to each other to create communities, and the first principles of our state. What better issue to launch KPR?


"[The first issue] was motivated by the reality that we have normalized the misconception that we are a post-racial society and have ignored the fact that racism is not a relic of the past, but an urgent crisis of the present."

This issue was inspired by the Black Lives Matter protests this past summer and the pandemic’s exposure of the institutionalized racism that has failed minority communities in our cities. It was motivated by the reality that we have normalized the misconception that we are a post-racial society and have ignored the fact that racism is not a relic of the past, but an urgent crisis of the present.


I’m proud that, of all pieces submitted for the first issue the majority were written by self-identified women and racialized persons. Though our team is diverse, I recognize that we do not have contributors of Indigenous backgrounds which leaves a large gap in our policy discussion and more to be desired from our publication. In this issue, you will find non-Indigenous persons exploring and investigating the experiences of Indigenous persons and communities. Often, outsiders co-opt Indigenous stories and centre the narrative on themselves. KPR will not do this. KPR is an important training ground for our writers where they can learn to analyze, explore, and reflect critically on the devastating effect of poor policies. As long as our writers approach these policies and experiences with respect, humility, and empathy, we encourage them to explore. I want to note the fact that public policy practitioners do this everyday and given the fact that our writers will go on to lead the public policy discussion in the decades to come, we want KPR to be a platform to develop these necessary skills.


"The issue covers a diverse range of policy areas from many thoughtful and interesting perspectives, from the school-to-prison pipeline to the religiosity of the Basij; from how COVID-19 has affected Indigenous communities to a personal reflection on Quebec’s Bill 21 from our Managing Editor."

KPR is committed to meaningful allyship. All pieces in this issue on race link to further information from sources developed by members of the communities being discussed, no matter who has written the piece. We will consult with and interview a diverse range of academics, policy experts, and advocates to add context and lived experience to our policy discussions. In addition, we are currently working to implement strategies to ensure increased diversity to our team.


The issue covers a diverse range of policy areas from many thoughtful and interesting perspectives, from the school-to-prison pipeline to the religiosity of the Basij; from how COVID-19 has affected Indigenous communities to a personal reflection on Quebec’s Bill 21 from our Managing Editor. I encourage you to explore, learn something new, and to continue these conversations with your family and friends. Finally, as the Editor-in-Chief, I welcome you to contact me with any question, comments or concerns by sending me a Letter to the Editor here.


I want to thank my co-founders, Matthew Winter and Hibagh Ahmed for creating an organization with the professionalism and efficiency of an industry establishment, and for keeping me sane. I also want to thank the hard work of our colleagues Amy Hinchey and Tana Cheema.


I want to thank Dr. Mary Francoli, Dr. Lisa Mills, Dr. Neil Gerlach, Holly Klein-Swormink, Shannon Sullivan and Jenelle Williams for the early support and financial backing we received from the Arthur Kroeger College, BPAPM and BGInS. Without your early advice and guidance, we would not have made it this far and we have so much more to learn.


I want to thank our incredible team of writers, editors, and directors who have given so much to KPR. When people first signed on to the project three months ago, there were few tangibles for them to assess and evaluate their decision; at the end of the day, they didn’t sign on to what they saw in front of them, but they were signing on to our vision, what they saw in their heads, and I’m very grateful for their trust and support. Without them this would not have been possible.


Finally, I want to thank SAhana Kapur, Ben Beiles, Cooper Mendelson-Grasse, and Riley Bance for assisting in the creation of this foreword.


We have so much more in store and I hope you'll join us as we grow.


Brian Huynh